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The Jobs Most at Risk of Redundancy

By: Emma Eilbeck BA (hons) - Updated: 5 Sep 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Redundancies Sectors Trade Industry

It is likely that at some point in everybody’s career they will find themselves in a position where they face the threat of redundancy.

Most sectors will go through highs and lows in terms of how many redundancies they make, but there are some industries and sectors where jobs will always be in a vulnerable position.

Distribution, Hotels and Restaurants

The latest figures from the National Office of Statistics show the distribution, hotels and restaurant trade suffered the most redundancies in the first quarter of 2010.The redundancy rate for people working in this sector was just over 26%. The sector has been one of the worst hit since the start of the financial crisis. In 1998 the sector had one of the lowest rates of redundancies.

When times are tough luxuries such as eating out and short breaks are the first to go. Although the sector is suffering at the moment when the market picks up it is likely to be a buoyant sector again as people start to splash out on life’s little luxuries.

Financial and Business Services

It comes as little surprise that the finance and business sector has been one of the worst hit in the financial crisis. It is the sector with the highest rate of redundancies. It suffered a 20% redundancy rate in Q1 of 2010, surprisingly though this rate has held steady over the past 12 years. Even at the peak of the financial boom the redundancy rate was still between 15-20%. Like the hotel and catering sectors though finance is a sector that will always have a role to play. Although this role has condensed in recent times the sector has put the worst behind it and should hopefully not see any more widespread redundancies.

Manufacturing

The manufacturing trade has always had a rollercoaster ride in terms of redundancies. It is currently the third worst sector to work for in terms of redundancies, but has made an improvement since 2001 – 2003 when it has a redundancy rate close to 40%. Its redundancy rate is now roughly half of what it was at 16%. Job losses in the manufacturing trade come as a result of firms cutting down on new large scale projects. Over the years the UK has had big chunks of its manufacturing trade eaten up by other countries who can offer more competitive pricing and more advanced technology.

Construction

Believe it or not, the construction industry is one of safer sectors you can work in and has a redundancy rate of around 15%. This has increased steadily over the years and it is likely it will increase even more in the coming years. The government’s planned spending cuts mean large construction projects that were due to take place may be cancelled.

Transport and Communications

The transport sector has the second lowest rate of redundancies, with a rate of around 7%. The sector has always had a low rate of redundancies and it looks set to stay that way. The government is always investing in transport and the role of train and bus workers will never be eradicated as they are vital public services. The airline industry has been one of the worst affected areas in terms of redundancies of late, but this has been balanced by the government’s investment in new rail links.

Public Administration and Health

This sector had the lowest number of redundancies in the first part of 2010 and it looks set to stay this way. The government is reluctant to make any cuts to the health service and public administration. Although the sector might not have a high rate of redundancies it is also not recruiting on a large scale.

No sector is 100% safe from redundancies and just because one sector is safe this year it does not necessarily mean it will be the following year. You should not let the threat of redundancies influence your chosen career path but you should keep it in mind if you are thinking of changing your career.

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[Add a Comment]
After an Email from our HR dept looking for volunteers, I applied for a support package offering me 1 years salary, this was at the end of June. I was told by our HR dept that if I was accepted it had to be completed by the end of Sept & I would be leaving then.I am still waiting for an answer, when I ask they say it's still being considered.My question is what is a reasonable time to wait for an answer, I have 28 years service & I'm feeling very anxious & angry at the time this is taking.
anxious - 5-Sep-17 @ 10:53 PM
I have just found out that i am being made redundant, i have been with the company a few years, the package is very good however i had breast cancer three years ago and when i returned i was unaware that even though i had been with the company the longest i was the lowest paid, my manager fought for an increase but they could only do it very gradually so i missed out on not only more money but my pension and bonus's would also mean that i do not get the same as the others. Now redundancy is due and i am nearly on the same as them but i have lost out. Now i am being made redundant can i mention this as this could be classed as discrimination. Where do i stand?
lizzie - 3-Jul-16 @ 2:02 PM
Tyres - Your Question:
I am currently in the consultation process, but already my employer has made me sign a letter stating that I wish the redundancy to proceed. The reason for the redundancy? Because I did not want to work a 24 hour breakdown service.I was taken on on the basis that I did not work on a 24 hour breakdown, I was demoted to store an, then back on the breakdown vans, moved from depot to depot. I was ill during July 2015 - I had never been off ill in y working life. The firm are trying to say that I a unfit, which is not true, I work 100% during the day with no assistance, have had no complaints, I just did not want to work 60 plus hours per week.

Our Response:
In this case I suggest giving ACAS a call to ensure you are not being singled out for redundancy. Redundancy is not aimed at a person, but at a specific job role, meaning your job/position would have to be made redundant not you. There seems to be a bit of a conflict in reasoning here, therefore I advise you take some professional employment advice. You can access the ACAS site via the link here. Please also see article: Overview of Your Employer's Obligations here. I hope this helps.
RedundancyExpert - 9-May-16 @ 11:32 AM
I am currently in the consultation process, but already my employer has made me sign a letter stating that I wish the redundancy to proceed.The reason for the redundancy?Because I did not want to work a 24 hour breakdown service.....I was taken on on the basis that I did not work on a 24 hour breakdown, I was demoted to store an, then back on the breakdown vans, moved from depot to depot.I was ill during July 2015 - I had never been off ill in y working life.The firm are trying to say that I a unfit, which is not true, I work 100% during the day with no assistance, have had no complaints, I just did not want to work 60 plus hours per week.
Tyres - 8-May-16 @ 1:30 PM
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